Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

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100 traditional yet surprisingly modern recipes from the far northern corners of Russia, featuring ingredients and dishes that young Russians are rediscovering as part of their heritage.

IACP AWARD FINALIST • LONGLISTED FOR THE ART OF EATING PRIZE • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND FORBES

“A necessary resource for food writers and for eaters, a fascinating read and good excuse to make fermented oatmeal.”—Bon Appétit


Russian cookbooks tend to focus on the food that was imported from France in the nineteenth century or the impoverished food of the Soviet era. Beyond the North Wind explores the true heart of Russian food, a cuisine that celebrates whole grains, preserved and fermented foods, and straightforward but robust flavors.

Recipes for a dazzling array of pickles and preserves, infused vodkas, homemade dairy products such as farmers cheese and cultured butter, puff pastry hand pies stuffed with mushrooms and fish, and seasonal vegetable soups showcase Russian foods that are organic and honest--many of them old dishes that feel new again in their elegant minimalism. Despite the country''s harsh climate, this surprisingly sophisticated cuisine has an incredible depth of flavor to offer in dishes like Braised Cod with Horseradish, Roast Lamb with Kasha, Black Currant Cheesecake, and so many more.

This home-style cookbook with a strong sense of place and evocative storytelling brings to life a rarely seen portrait of Russia, its people, and its palate—with 100 recipes, gorgeous photography, and essays on the little-known culinary history of this fascinating and wild part of the world.

Review

“I squealed with joy when I learned that Darra was writing this book and the results are even more magnificent that I could have imagined.  Beyond the North Wind is at once vividly passionate and methodically researched—a love letter to Russian cooking and hospitality.” —Bonnie Morales, author and chef of Kachka
 

“This is Darra Goldstein’s masterpiece. Not only is this book full of invaluable research, it is also brimming with warm words and love for real Russia—its people and their wonderful food and unique culture.” —Olia Hercules, author of Mamushka
 
“In this beautifully written, gorgeously photographed volume, Darra Goldstein captures both the archaic soul of old Russia and the hip new global zeitgeist. Her love letter to the mysterious Russian North brims with revelations, from recipes I can’t wait to make—dandelion blossom syrup! pumpkin pancakes!—to intimate portraits of cooks, erudite historical essays, and evocative travel notes. Part recipe collection, part cultural anthropology, part poetic evocation of place, this is the best kind of cookbook: one that evokes an entire culture at the table.” —Anya von Bremzen, author Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking
 
“Ever since I started to cook from Darra Goldstein’s classic book,  A Taste of Russia, I have wanted her to return and explore more, to look at what’s happening in Russia now, to see how it has meshed the old with the new.  Beyond the North Wind­—rich, delicious, human—has been well worth the wait. Nobody knows more about Russian food and culture than Darra. This is my cookbook highlight of the year.” —Diana Henry, James Beard Award–winning author

About the Author

Darra Goldstein is the author of Fire + Ice, which was nominated for James Beard, IACP, and The Art of Eating awards. The founding editor of Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, named Publication of the Year by the James Beard Foundation, Darra also serves as series editor of California Studies in Food and Culture, and has written for Gourmet, Saveur, Bon Appétit, and The New York Times.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

Chasing the Past

It''s midnight at the edge of the frozen Barents Sea, yet the world is in motion. Ice pellets skitter along the strand; the northern lights undulate across the sky. I’m two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle, in February, and I don’t think I’ve ever felt a wind more fierce. Russia’s legendary winter enfolds me—the cold and the snow that defeated Napoleon, the famed “General Winter” that conquered the Wehrmacht. But really, it’s not so bad—in fact, it’s enthralling. The cosmic display is riveting in its shape-shifting forms, its wondrous streaks and saturations. Eventually I tear myself away and trudge back to the guesthouse in the dark, tripping over snowdrifts, hoping not to lose my footing or my way. Indoors at last, I take ten minutes to shed my clumsy felt boots and multiple layers of clothing. My fingers are frozen stiff—I finally feel what that cliché means. The unheated anteroom doesn’t help me thaw, and after the invigorating outdoor air, the smoke hanging in the room feels suffocating. Men are banished here to smoke, in this middle kingdom between comfort and cold.

Once inside the house, I begin to feel cozy. The kitchen windows are steamy with condensation. I pop into the bathroom, which doubles as the laundry room. It’s filled with plastic tubs of all sizes in fluorescent shades of pink, blue, and green. Tattered dish towels hang from makeshift clotheslines, their wide-eyed, patterned puppy dogs oblivious to the trays of kitty litter below. Someone has pulled the floral shower curtain back from the freestanding shower stall, and there, right on the base of the stall, I find a huge pot of Kamchatka crab legs. Truly enormous, straight out of a 1950s sci-fi movie. If I were to lie down side by side with one of these monsters, its leg span would be longer than I am. I decide not to try it.

It occurs to me that the steam must be from the boiling seawater into which these legs will soon descend. And sure enough, within fifteen minutes, the crabs are on the table, along with shot glasses of vodka, bowls of melted butter, and a basket of bread. Who needs anything more? By the time we finish cracking the giant crab legs and dipping them in butter, it’s past 2 a.m. I decide to take a shower to get completely toasty for bed. The guesthouse is silent. The shower curtain is once more in place. I pull it aside only to find the crab pot, now empty, back in the stall. But there’s room for us both, and so I step in. As the hot water rains down, I’m enveloped in a mist of salt and crab—far more aromatic and restorative than any spa treatment I’ve ever enjoyed. Afterward, I tumble into bed and think, “Yes, I really am in the Russian North!”

The Allure of the Arctic

But what, really, was I doing on the Kola Peninsula? Jutting into the Arctic Ocean, it’s one of the literal ends of the earth—next stop, North Pole. I thought of the early polar expeditions on foot and on skis, which usually ended in disaster. I thought of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein chasing his monster over the ice. I reconsidered the phrase “going to extremes.”

It was no accident that I’d traveled to the remote village of Teriberka, braving the narrow tundra road from Murmansk whose formidable snowdrifts almost forced us to abandon the journey. Until the Soviet Union collapsed, Teriberka had thriving cod and haddock fisheries. Now the village was nearly deserted and—thanks to the Golden Globe–winning film Leviathan—synonymous with corruption and despair. But the extremes of this place invigorated my senses: the light and colors in the crystalline sky, the glimpses of ethereal beauty amid squalor and decay. The soothing aroma of braised elk softened the Arctic air. Yet a deeper reason had propelled me to the Kola Peninsula. It was here, in this isolated part of Russia, that I hoped to get beyond the outside influences that had shaped both imperial Russian dining and proletarian Soviet fare. I wanted to find the elemental flavors underlying traditional Russian cuisine. I was deliberately chasing the past.

It all started for me with blini, those irresistible pancakes that Chekhov described as “plump as the shoulders of a merchant’s daughter.” True blini aren’t the dry, bite-size morsels passed at cocktail receptions, mere vehicles for smoked salmon. The original Russian pancakes are lacy, with the robust flavor of buckwheat and pocked with pores to soak up melted butter. Saucer-size blini are one of Russia’s most ancient dishes, dating back to pre-Christian times, when they were baked on hot stones at the spring equinox. Shaped into rounds in the image of the sun, they beckoned the return of solar warmth after the long, dark winter.

Not surprisingly, the pagan people living in this northern region practiced a cult of the sun until Christianity was introduced in the tenth century. Their early beliefs still echo today through the round golden blini traditionally prepared for Maslenitsa, the Butter Festival marking a farewell to winter that evolved into a weeklong pancake indulgence before Lent—an all-out celebration that included troika and toboggan rides, ritualized fistfights, and kissing fests. Images of light and sun abound in Russian folktales, where the trees in distant magical kingdoms hang heavy with golden apples, and a single feather from the elusive firebird is incandescent enough to illuminate an entire room. One hero, Ivan Tsarevich, undertakes impossible quests to the mythical Kingdom under the Sun, an earthly paradise where the sun always shines. In other tales, a crystal mountain shimmers, and crystal bridges radiate light. Within these stories, passed on for more than a thousand years through poetry and song, lies a meaning deeper than fantasy expressing the Russians’ collective ancestral memory of a northern land close to the sun representing paradise on earth. Some geographers have suggested that this utopia wasn’t just wishful thinking, arguing that before the last ice age, the climate of the North was far more temperate than it is today, that deep in the past, the seasons may not have cycled into such relentlessly harsh winters. There may indeed have been warmth, radiant light, and lush vegetation even at this northernmost fringe of Europe.

Hints of this splendid land can be found in the name of the Kola Peninsula, which evokes kolo, an ancient Slavonic term for the sun. There are reminders, too, in the winter solstice holiday known as Kolyada, when Russians celebrate the shortest day of the year and the rebirth of the sun by baking gingerbread in the form of goats, birds, cows, and bears to bring good fortune. The Russian version of the Gingerbread Man, Kolobok, is round as the sun, a shape that allows him to tumble freely through field and meadow until he’s outwitted by a clever fox.

In the nineteenth century, dozens of spiraling stone labyrinths, believed by some anthropologists to trace the orbit of the sun, were discovered on the Solovetsky Islands off the southwestern coast of the Kola Peninsula. The abundance of solar associations in folklore and in life, coupled with the mythical geographies recorded by Herodotus and Pliny the Elder, led some Soviet researchers to conjecture that northwestern Russia was the site of the legendary realm that the ancient Greeks considered the cradle of civilization: Hyperborea, the land “Beyond the North Wind,” where the sun always shone and people lived to a thousand years without discord or sorrow, in a land so divine that the sun god Apollo himself traveled there. Hyperborea was a place of spiritual centeredness where people lived in harmony with nature, absorbing positive energy from the sun as well as from the magnetic North Pole. Hyperborea was considered the birthplace of human ingenuity, of technology. Is it a coincidence that the earliest Russian sagas describe ingenious towers inside which shimmered the sun, moon, and stars?

Such luminous mythology may seem a long way from Teriberka’s visible decay, but even as the abandoned fisheries and desolation bespeak the death of Soviet life, Russia’s past—the distant past—seems very much alive. My travels to Russia’s Far North, including the Kola Peninsula and the Arkhangelsk region to the east, revealed a deep connection to bygone eras. Beyond the cities lie villages lost in time, virtually unchanged for hundreds of years, where the inhabitants still use traditional masonry stoves for cooking and heating, and still fetch water from the river. Most do enjoy electricity, thanks to diesel generators, so they may also have TV. And it’s not that they are unaware of the present; they’ve simply chosen to live by different rhythms.

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Mad about Music
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The good news is the bad news: It''s (extremely) authentic
Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2020
This is a beautiful book - a coffee table cookbook, and I''m returning it. This isn''t a cookbook for your average cook - probably not even your fine cook. The dilemma is that it''s so authentic (I know, that''s not supposed to be a bad thing) that the ingredients are beyond... See more
This is a beautiful book - a coffee table cookbook, and I''m returning it. This isn''t a cookbook for your average cook - probably not even your fine cook. The dilemma is that it''s so authentic (I know, that''s not supposed to be a bad thing) that the ingredients are beyond the reach of most of the cooks in the world outside Russia. Yes, the author includes a list of sources, so you can assemble things like sea buckthorn berries etc. at enormous trouble and expense, but why? Bottom line, many of the recipes are complicated and many of the ingredients are out of reach - so it''s a cookbook you really can''t cook from regularly. It''s more of an historical document - an accurate snapshot of Russian food. Fascinating - but not of much use as a COOK book.
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The great man
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2020
Very interesting recipes, however, the author, herself being a granddaughter of a Russia Jew, who had escaped the terrible life in a country refers to Lenin as “the great man ho so fatefully arrived to foment revolution.” Reading this many of the recipes, even the... See more
Very interesting recipes, however, the author, herself being a granddaughter of a Russia Jew, who had escaped the terrible life in a country refers to Lenin as “the great man ho so fatefully arrived to foment revolution.” Reading this many of the recipes, even the non-fermented one, turned very sour and unpalatable for me.
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Matt W
5.0 out of 5 stars
A New Great Cuisine to try !
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
All right I admit it. I forgot. The day Beyond the North Wind by Darra Goldstein landed on my doorstep I said to my myself. Oh yea, Russia! I have totally forgotten to cook food from this far off place. Caught up mostly in Asian, Mexican, Italian, Indian and American food... See more
All right I admit it. I forgot. The day Beyond the North Wind by Darra Goldstein landed on my doorstep I said to my myself. Oh yea, Russia! I have totally forgotten to cook food from this far off place. Caught up mostly in Asian, Mexican, Italian, Indian and American food to name a few I have never been exposed to the idea of Russian food. There are no Russian restaurants in my neighborhood and my travels as a photographer have not been fortunate enough to land me on her shores. So it was with great excitement that I sat in the sun and dove into this unique cookbook on the Russian North.

An award winning cookbook author and Russian food scholar, Darra Goldstein has spent more than 40 years immersed in Russian culture and cuisine. The introduction is a wonderful mix of history, travel, and gastronomic discovery. I adore how cookbooks have evolved into part non-fiction travel journal combined with coffee table photo book beauty. This is a cookbook that you can sit in bed with and read, discover and be lifted away to Russia for a brief moment. The book is beautifully designed and photographed. With fantastic food and travel photography by Stefan Wettainen.

There are nine main chapters. 1- Drinks, Preserves and Sauces 2 - Ferments 3 - Pies, Pancakes and Dumplings, 4 - Soups, 5 - Salads and Vegetables, 6 - Grains, 7- Fish, 8 - Meat and 9- Sweets. Inter-mixed in between these pages are wonderful descriptions and tales on different topics such as The Flavors of Russia, The Poetry of Place, A Tale of Two Soups, Trans-Siberian Tales and Performing the Meal to name a few. These short chapters offer great depth and color to the experience of this culinary journey.

A chose to begin with a simple drink called a Kvass. Kvass means to ferment or sour. It is one of Russia''s oldest and most basic drinks that "offers a great canvas for experimentation."
I made the Raspberry Kvass which took about a day to cook and ferment using instant yeast. This was so good ! It had a similar taste and experience to drinking kombucha but I found it much more pleasant. Lighter all around without that strong itch ones gets in the back of your throat from kombucha. The drink tasted like summer. It was so fresh, lightly flavored with honey and organic raspberries. I could see myself serving this to guests on my deck at sunset after a hot day.

Next up I made a meal out of two recipes. First was the fantastic Russian Hand Pies and second the Dried Mushroom and Barley Soup. The recipe made about 16 pies and paired really well with the hearty soup. The dough was simple to make and had a short rise time of about 90 minutes. The filling was a flavorful combination of the sour, acidic and almost salty flavor of saurkraut, with the earthiness of dried mushrooms ,onions, hard boiled eggs and caraway seeds. Caraway seeds are a spice I so rarely use and were such a welcome flavor adding hints of anise, citrus and pepper. I chose to make my own dipping sauce for the pies mixing sour cream and sriracha sauce. So good ! I served the pies along side a big bowl of Dried Mushroom and Barley Soup. This is such a hearty, earthy soup that one could imagine groups of workers digging into after a day in the fields. Made with pungent dried mushrooms, onions, carrots, potato, barley and spices such as garlic and bay leaf this was an easy meal to prepare. I chose to cook it in an insta-pot and it pretty much cooked itself. Both of these dishes made for great left overs for days.

Next I made Pumpkin Pancakes. Substituting butternut squash for the pumpkin, this was a quick dish to make for lunch on a busy Saturday. Using whole milk kefir, egg, baking soda, scallions and a dollop of sour cream on top. This meal was put to together in less than 30 minutes. The sweet, nutty flavor of the squash paired so well with the tang of the sour cream and sharp bite of the scallion. My kids loved them!

Lastly, I made my favorite meal of the bunch ! Oven - Braised Veal Stew with Cherries which I served with Mashed Potatoes and Parsley Root. I am pretty sure anyone who lands on this page will make it based on the photo alone. I can''t remember I time that I ever have cooked a dinner with cherries in it. I do not eat veal so I chose to substitute with chicken thighs. ( I had to add 3x the water for the lack of moisture) and also had to use sweet cherries instead of sour cherries as it was not cherry season and my selection was limited. So as not to over sweeten things I reduced the honey by half and added less cherries. Wanting a note of sour though to make up for the sweeter cherries I served it along side the wonderful Mashed Potatoes and Parsley Root recipe which is made with sour cream instead of the traditional milk. This was the sour note I needed to balance out the sweet cherries!

The stew was easy to make and tasted so good. It was such an interesting mix of flavors using cherries, honey, cinnamon, cardamon and bay leaf. I tried to grasp each flavor on its own but must say it was the sum of the parts that really hit home. It was a flavor that was very much its own and mixed on my fork with the potato and parsley root mash was to die for.

Up next I am looking forward to making Vegetarian Cabbage Rolls, Chicken Pie, Siberian Dumplings, and a few desserts such as Gooseberry Mousse, Black Bread Pudding with Apples and Black Currant Ice Cream.

It was a joy to read, cook and learn from this book. Thanks for the free book @tenspeedpress !
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating mix of Russian culture and food
Reviewed in the United States on March 9, 2020
I will try a great number of recipes in this book. They are simple and emphasize the intrinsic character of the food.
3 people found this helpful
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Margaret Warren
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So much fun!
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2021
Russian cuisine was something I knew very little about. This book has changed all of that and my Russian friends love it!!! This has been so much fun to rad and to cook with... I highly recommend it!
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M. Bell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Gorgeous cookbook -- quick service
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2020
Beautifully photographed cookbook with tempting recipes. Arrived promptly, in great condition!
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Ehmuhlee
5.0 out of 5 stars
(Modern) Russian Foraging + Fermenting
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
Each time I pick up Beyond the North Wind I find something new and intriguing that piques my interest, whether it’s about the culture of Northern Russia or a new way of thinking about food. This book is excellent for those who want to add fermented foods (and... See more
Each time I pick up Beyond the North Wind I find something new and intriguing that piques my interest, whether it’s about the culture of Northern Russia or a new way of thinking about food.

This book is excellent for those who want to add fermented foods (and drinks!) with gut friendly pro-biotics to their diet. 

I decided to make the Bird Cherry Cake, Sasha’s Apple Cake, Raspberry Kvass, and the Baked Apples with Caramel Sauce and Puffed Buckwheat for my friends and family. There were a few things I was curious about making, however finding spruce needles, 350 organic dandelion blossoms, and raw milk (for farmer’s cheese) are tough to come by where I live. 

I still intend to make the "Pickle" Pies, Vatrushki, and the Farmer''s Cheese Pancakes.

Be aware that the ingredients can require some dedication to sourcing, foraging, and finding. I appreciate that authenticity, because I live in a vastly different climate and area than Russia. Although I have a very wide array of pantry items - both staples and somewhat unusual things, I enjoy the challenge. Some of my foraging was the more modern variety as I literally scraped the bottom of the bulk bins at Whole Foods for buckwheat groats.

To create the Bird Cherry Cake, I ordered the flour via Amazon and procured the lingonberry from IKEA. It came together rather quickly and adults and kids alike asked for another slice. It has a rich flavor that has notes of almond, cherry, and pumpernickel with a toothsome quality. It’s also gluten free and a unique flavor that most everyone enjoyed.

Sasha’s Apple Cake could very easily be created to be vegan. It kind of reminded me of something familiar that you’d have visiting a babushka (Grandmother). Super simple and effortless, but healthy. Definitely use Granny Smith apples for this one or it might be a tad too sweet.



The Raspberry Kvass has an effervescent quality that is refreshing, though it should definitely be served chilled. I was also confused why there was a need for 3 bottles, as mine easily fit into two.



Lastly, the Baked Apples with Caramel Sauce and Puffed Buckwheat seemed so fancy and is fun to present. Golden Delicious apples weren’t available near me so I used Opal apples (a cross between Golden Delicious and Topaz). The mix of textures is a fun twist with apples, which can be a bit boring. I didn’t anticipate my groats going from toasted to burned without more than a few popping as pictured in the book, so I went back to the store to find more buckwheat. I''m not someone who often makes anything deep fried, so I also read online that they could be dry roasted, but alas mine did not pop as pictured in the book, despite attempting 4 different methods. The mix of textures and methods is something I''ll carry into other recipes I create.

This book is a success if you’re looking for authentic recipes from Russia and willing to put in the work, including sourcing specific ingredients. I like the process and time that is needed in many of these recipes and being able to make them in advance for my review. It’s widened my cultural scope through food and given me an appreciation for the lengths people go for food and interesting methods of preservation. Thanks for the free book, @tenspeedpress! I always appreciate having my culinary and cultural creativity challenged and learning some new skills and information along the way.
19 people found this helpful
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Cl
4.0 out of 5 stars
Just like bubby made, but hipper !
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
I always thought that Russian cuisine was all beets and potatoes but on the first page, Goldstein takes that myth and clues the reader in . Borscht is from Ukraine and potatoes weren’t grown in Russia until the mid nineteenth century . Fermentation , and preserves are... See more
I always thought that Russian cuisine was all beets and potatoes but on the first page, Goldstein takes that myth and clues the reader in . Borscht is from Ukraine and potatoes weren’t grown in Russia until the mid nineteenth century .
Fermentation , and preserves are big due to the harsh climate, and poor soil.
The recipes in this book are ancient , yet seem modern due to the diy culture of late .

The first recipe I tried was the fermented oatmeal, which is soaked for 24 hours , then sits for 48 hours with a piece of bread on top ,and is then cooked . It was pleasantly sour and shockingly enjoyable !

There are six variations to kasha/buckwheat, I made the one with sautéed onions and mushrooms and it was just as delicious as the one my grandmother used to make .

One detail I really appreciate about this book, is the conscious effort to avoid waste . The millet porridge with pumpkin recipe calls for half of a pumpkin. In the headnotes, the author lets us know that we can grate the rest for the pumpkin pancake recipe !
The ingredients are all easily obtainable except for a small number of things which can be found on the internet /amazon.

The photography in this book is gorgeous, and the rich writing of Goldstein makes the reader feel like we are really there .
The only issue I have with this book is that I wish the measurements for the baking recipes were given in grams .
I’ve received a free copy from Ten Speed Press in exchange for a free and unbiased review.
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Top reviews from other countries

Mrs Curzon Tussaud
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful book, unusual recipes.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 30, 2020
I haven’t yet been able to cook anything from this book but will try to get some ingredients in my next shopping trip*. The photos are great, and for a keen cook, opening this book is like opening a door into a new kitchen with new ideas and combinations abounding. *Written...See more
I haven’t yet been able to cook anything from this book but will try to get some ingredients in my next shopping trip*. The photos are great, and for a keen cook, opening this book is like opening a door into a new kitchen with new ideas and combinations abounding. *Written during lockdown March 2020.
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TRUTHBKNOWN
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
DISMAL
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 28, 2020
Dark and oppressive both in photographs and prose. Bulked out with simple recipes. Returned.
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zuza zak
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunning book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 5, 2021
Evocative, interesting, inspiring book!
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Kristin C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just fabulous
Reviewed in Canada on February 2, 2021
I''d rank Dara Goldstein''s cookbooks among the best--they blend social history with travelogue, and showcase accessible recipes that really create a sense of the cultures they celebrate. We''ve worked our way through another great volume of hers--Fire and Ice--and are now...See more
I''d rank Dara Goldstein''s cookbooks among the best--they blend social history with travelogue, and showcase accessible recipes that really create a sense of the cultures they celebrate. We''ve worked our way through another great volume of hers--Fire and Ice--and are now doing the same with Beyond the North Wind. I feel I really get a great deal of insight into these recipes and the importance of their components, and am super pleased. Not only can I make these dishes at home, but I now feel better informed in the Russian, Ukranian and even Polish delis and groceries in my neighbourhood and can actually talk about the dishes we enjoy. Some books just pass through my cookbook collection, but Dara''s are here to stay. A+
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Anastasia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Takes one back to childhood in Russia
Reviewed in Germany on May 31, 2020
Loved this book! Such a nice mix of memories, cultural commentary and solid recipes.
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Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online

Beyond the North wholesale Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore [A 2021 Cookbook] online